Member Monday: Michelle Lukic

Attorney // Wexler Wallace, LLP

Description of your practice:
My practice includes complex class action and multidistrict litigation in numerous legal areas, including antitrust litigation, mass tort litigation, and consumer protection. As an attorney at Wexler Wallace, LLP, I have the privilege of investigating and aggressively pursuing cases that promote changes intended to benefit the public and provide the maximum remedies under the law for those whose lives have been impacted.


Why are you a member of the WBAI?
I am a member of the WBAI because it is a remarkable community comprised of confident, successful, bold women who support one another both personally and professionally. It is important to surround myself with women who can offer both support and advice based on their personal experiences as female attorneys. WBAI facilitates an open dialogue that furthers the development and empowerment of women by providing valuable networking opportunities while applauding women for their professional accomplishments.


What do you think is the best way to empower women in law? 
The best way to empower women in law would be to support their endeavors and give them the opportunity and/or resources to succeed. I love that WBAI helps cultivate these meetings with women in all areas of the law affording all of its members the opportunity to build meaningful business relationships.


What are you most looking forward to in the following year, personally/professionally?
Professionally, as a young lawyer, I am looking forward to fostering new business relationships this coming year. Personally, I am looking forward to getting back to in-studio group fitness classes, specifically Pilates.


Tell us something interesting about you.
I am a first-generation Albanian. My father immigrated from Montenegro (former Yugoslavia) and opened up his own business in 1989. My parents have owned Embers Deli, the hometown staple of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, for the past 31 years. I started working with my parents at a young age up through college and, essentially, grew up at the deli.